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  • 10 Things That Kill Gaming!


    JayGriffin

    10 Things That Kill Gaming

     

     

         The world of gaming has indisputably shifted in terms of what we consider making them successful and acceptable, however, there are just as many trends in gaming that can be said to justify why we would rather think of them as failures. Now, if you’re anything like me, and you miss the times of gaming when life wasn’t so complicated and you didn’t have to worry about buying a game, and then buying essentially a pass or key to the rest of the game, or just pay-to-win related bullshit, then I’m sure you’re aware of where this article is going. This is not to say that these choices aren’t clever, profitable, and overall more convenient for promoting a game or service, although, it is a sort of insight into these business habits and the negative effects it has on the gaming community.

     

     

    ·       Micro-transactions

     

        This list has no particular order I’m trying to convey for the type of fuckery we receive, but micro-transactions are probably by far the most bigoted. You buy a game that costs, let’s be honest, sometimes more than what they are worth, and then you realize that everything in the game is designed to keep you playing it for all of eternity. Lengthening the game is a great thing to do, but not when most of the time spent on the game is literally working for the game, working for items in the game that are worth a shit load of your assets. Well, fear not, because now you can just buy your way towards these rewards without the stressful grinding and repetition. To hell with it, right? You see, the problem with this is that it allows someone to attain the unattainable by giving money to seemingly greedy developers who had anticipated that they could make even more profit through the in-game content, because they know that the common person isn’t going to sit there and slave away for these incentives. How about you just make the game balanced, yet challenging, to begin with. Maybe then you could have a product with less contempt, or better yet, less frustration and more personal investments from the gamers.

     

    ·       Digital-Only

        One of the best parts about having options with games is that we can either purchase the game physically, or digitally. That’s just it though, it’s only sometimes optional, because some games require you to only purchase them through the e-stores or through some kind of redeem codes that you’ll receive after payment, or even bundled with other games as one of the perks of having an upgraded version of the game’s deliverance. Imagine what this could mean for the future of how we play games, if this becomes the permanent method of acquiring games. Forget about going to the store and getting the physical copy and sniffing it like a druggie, forget about that feeling of sliding it into the disc tray after sifting through the contents of the case, forget about your friend asking to borrow the game until they themselves could possibly get ahold of it, and forget about the thought of throwing the game like a frisbee when shit gets too hectic on a mission, etc. Imagine walking into a retailer like Walmart, Target, BestBuy, GameStop, or wherever they sell your physical copy of choice, and instead of game cases, there’s just a wall of the game images, or a screen, and you click on it and request to purchase it, then they give you a small redeem code to activate or process it through your email. It does sound cool as hell, yes, as an option, but I wouldn’t want it as a method to replace physical copies.

     

    ·       DLC (Downloadable Content)

        Don’t you ever just wonder why games can’t just come with everything in them already? I mean, I get it, the developers want to extend the life of their games and provide additional content for players to enjoy once the game is released. The part I don’t get is that they could just put all of this content into the game from the start and they themselves can sit back and profit from theirs games, but also move on and focus their development time into a new, fresh project. There are games that have content within the standard editions that are mind boggling and sometimes even overwhelming, but a good overwhelming, and that’s how it should be, yet they themselves come with DLC that is stupendous and could arguably be seem as appropriate in terms of being add-on content. It’s fine in those situations, but when there’s a game—and there’s a lot---that release as an unfinished product that we just paid full price for, and the DLC is practically the foundation of the game and its substance, then what the fuck is that about? It’s not cute, it’s not cool, it has to go. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem to be going anywhere, but at least it’s getting more awareness and developers are seeing the consequences through their fan-bases.

     

    ·       Cloud Saving

          Cloud saving your game data to a hard disk isn’t the most efficient thing to be doing, especially in the event that they get damaged, but neither is saving a game strictly through a cloud service. I’m not saying it happens all the time, but there have been situations where game progress is only synced through a cloud-based infrastructure and as a result, it’s all been lost or pieces of information have been removed because of technical difficulties in a place where you have no control over or even know where it’s located for that matter. This is the future, it’s been the future, but trust me, there seems to be breakthroughs with what we can create, as it relates to this kind of stuff, that can cause this to be the only way to play your game, but what if there’s no network connection? Then I guess you’re either stuck playing with a stick and a can on the street, or popping in a game that actually matters when you have no internet or anything of that nature.

     

    ·       VR (Virtual Reality)

        VR is in the phases of being the absolute next major leap for gaming, and it has been fantasized and revered since it was even a concept. It’s not just some idea anymore because we’re finding ways to further implement it into our lives for purposes even outside of gaming, which is, well…fucking awesome.  But you know what’s not fucking awesome? If it gets to a point where VR is replacing the experience of playing a game with and actual controller, TV, and monitor. Imagine you and me looking back say, 50 years from now when you’re much older and crustier, and you see the generation of that time having some kind of assembly for the appreciation of gaming and its history, but you see a controller being shown off as some kind of fossil or object that would be worth millions if one were ever to be found in that day and age. The thought of that to me if frightening, but then again, I’m sure that’s what the people thought back when arcades were the only place you could place games before the invention of consoles for your home were available, or when it went a step further and we were able to play portable consoles within the size of our very hands. All I’m saying is that we need to stay woke—not awake—woke, so that we can see this all coming with no surprise because it’s possible and it’s nearly happening.

     

    ·       Delays

        Time and time again, we have been promised a game by a certain time and release date, and we feel a sense of fulfillment when we are approaching the days of release, like when the season finale to your show is about to release and you feel the anticipation of what it could bring and change. The same applies to games, but unlike episodes to a show that can be delayed until the next week without too much frustration, we wait additional months and sometimes years for the game to release because the developers tell us “The game isn’t finished and we need more time to polish it before we can go gold.” Whenever I hear that, the first thing I think of is as a response is “Then why the hell did you even mention a release date to begin with? It’s not about what you thought, there’s a team of people with you to figure this out, get your shit together.” Maybe those words mean something in a responsive gaming world, but for the most part, a lot of developers seem to listen to themselves and not their fans, for a cash grab. Sometimes that ‘unfinished’ section of the game is just the part of it that they added at the last minute to further suck the funds out of your wallet that nobody even asked for, but thanks? Yes, there are delays that bring miracles and much needed improvements to games, but how about you just mention the game and not mention a release date? Games have also been completely cancelled as a result of development hell that stemmed from numerous delays and reality checks. Also, no, I’m not a developer, so I don’t understand what goes on behind closed doors and who has to appease who or who tells who what, or who handles the marketing aspect of it, but I do understand that some of these teams need better management and decision-making skills.

     

    ·       Overhyping

        We’ve all been guilty of being in the climax of excitement for a game, watching all of the interviews, reading the latest news details, and looking through the interesting concept arts and minor gameplay videos that are available to us, certainly. It’s just… how many times have you done that for a game that released and it turned out to be hot shit? Like, literally a heated turd, not a fire-worthy experience. A lot of times I’m guessing. We see these games as the “saviors” for gaming, and the next big step, and some of them are, but it feels like that’s becoming less apparent these days. Funny enough, the games that we sleep on without even lifting an eye to keep up with are the ones that are surprising us and doing amazing jobs at delivering a memorable, satisfying gaming experience. I myself choose to not over-hype a game, even if I’m excited for it, because the reality is that once you have that game and have played through all of it, maybe even a few times, you start to lose the magic for it, and eventually move on to hyping something else. Your hunger for hyping is insatiable and it’s causing receptions to be on the bad end of games when they don’t bring you what you were expecting. This can result in people eventually being aware that they don’t want to buy a game, or pre-order a game from the jump because they’ve lost the trust to believe they are getting something worth putting on a pedestal.

     

    ·       Pirating

        Illegally gaining access to games are getting easier and easier as time goes by, but with many risk factors that come with it, like getting viruses, having the systems compromised, or having your device bricked entirely. What about all those times a game was played illegally before the embargo dates and gameplay was released online for all to view, spoilers revealed in the comment sections of videos that don’t even relate to the game sometimes, and yes, delays that have happened as a result of it. I’m not encouraging people to do it themselves, but if you are, at least just enjoy it for yourself and don’t be a fuck-head who ruins the experience of the game. The internet is a large place full of don’t-give-a-fuck kind of people, which makes sense, but I’d rather not have to sit there all day trying to both gain knowledge on new information of a game and avoid getting too much of it from some troll. That said, when you pirate the games, the developers become a lot tighter, close-lipped on us as a result because the trust has been breached in their eyes. I mean, sometimes it’s their faults though honestly because they give these games to people, who know other people, who will probably end up playing the game beforehand and anonymously giving details to Reddit. Also, this habit of having information “leaked” about a game. These are million-dollar companies, nobody’s leaking shit unless you have bad security that need more attention or you’re intentionally releasing that information to cause hype and speculation in the gaming community, but writing it off as something that was unveiled without your approval. That’s another topic in itself, so my point for this one is…stop stealing shit, you bum.

     

    ·       Graphics-Based

        We all love visuals that captivate us and make us want to invest further time into just the world of the game, but we also know that this kind of game comes with many faults. Sometimes, these games that come with high-scale graphics are only impressive with how they appear, but the actual game is lame as fuck. There’s usually a very short playthrough, lack of major gameplay elements, and dumbed down sections of the game because they just want it to appeal to your eyes. There are plenty of games that suck ass even without good graphics and ones that are brilliant without good graphics, yet some of those games that we see as eye candy, are the ones destroying gaming for us. What about all of those E3 experiences? The ones where we see a game with a beautiful scope of the landscape or city environment, and we get raging tingles down in our pants—because we have to pee and obviously don’t want to go to the bathroom, of course---and that alone was enough to sell us on the game really. Then, the release comes around and we find out that the game has been downgraded, despite the company telling us that they’ve only tweaked it, or hell, sometimes don’t even tell us what happened at all. It’s fucking up gaming is the point. I get that we’re in a time where visuals can be astounding, but if that’s your only selling point, then…maybe you should consider making movies? Because it seems like the games are the length of them anyway as a result of you trying to butter up the screen the whole time.

     

    ·       Multi-player Only

        There’s been this kind of saying as of recently, that single-player games are dying and will eventually be dead, but honestly, the multi-player games are the ones that will be dead before single-player. Dead in the sense that people will start to want more intimate experiences with games and not have to deal with BootyThunder17 running around, causing them to fuck up the mission or their chance to get something done. You see it happening to a lot of games now; you see them banking on the fact that the multi-player portion of the game will need to be the redeeming factor for its success. Sometimes they even split the game in half for you to have to individually download one portion or the other, which is cool for the sake of having options, but you ever think that they may be tracking which section of the game that their fan-base is flocking towards mostly, in order to determine which of those sections will eventually be the dominate one to work on for good? Other games have very interesting worlds and concepts, but it’s wasted on multi-player, just so they can milk money out of people, when really they’d probably be better of making a single-player experience that offers everything we would want and their sales would rise exponentially, but you know, logic and games never mixed well.

     

     

        Alright, those are some interesting points I thought I would mention that could kill gaming, or at least kill off the parts of it that we can still appreciate while there’s still time to, so what do you think can add to this list?

     

     



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